152, strong message to all those trying to misuse

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] Someone does not want to wait for the UN results. It is untrue to think that a military strike would help the peace conference. Instead, it would help Islamists, who want to dominate the opposition. Rome (AsiaNews) - The United States, Great Britain, France, and the Arab League are in a hurry to launch punitive action against Syria, guilty in their eyes of using chemical weapons against civilians in Ghouta, on the outskirts of Damascus on 21 August. Such a decision stems from charges made by the rebels who have posted online videos showing the chilling images of people dead from asphyxiation, children wrapped in shrouds, young people with muscle spasms and frothing at the mouth or with oxygen masks. [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]


[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] Almost immediately, the media circus stressed that the use of chemical weapons crossed Obama's "red line" against military intervention against Damascus.
Eventually, cautious statements by the United States became more confident, buttressed by those of Great Britain, then France, Turkey, Canada, Australia and the Arab League. Syria's traditional allies, Russia, China, and Iran instead reiterated their opposition an intervention. More tentatively, Italy, Germany and Poland also expressed their hostility to an intervention, favouring instead political talks. At present, as the US fleet is being deployed off the Syrian coast, decisions are being made about an intervention. The latter should last only a few days; it should target sites provided by the rebels; [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] it is not designed to bring down Assad; it will not stop a peace conference the UN and the Arab League are slowly preparing. Indeed, according to Arab sources, an attack against Syria will make such a conference easier to organise, Since the day when Ghouta was attacked, there has been a crescendo of statements, threats and promises to punish "crimes against humanity", which is how the use of chemical weapons is defined by the UN. At the same time, there has been a continuous drift towards the obvious conclusion that the Syrian regime was responsible for the chemical attack. Interventionist countries went first to the United Nations. When Syria and the rebels accepted the presence of inspectors, ensuring a cease-fire,  [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] the same countries said "it is too late", claiming that action was needed because "almost certainly" Damascus was responsible for the attack. Finally, last night, US Vice President Joe Biden said there was "no doubt" that the Syrian government was responsible. So did British Prime Minister David Cameron. Yet doubts do persist. On 25 August, speaking to the faithful in St Peter's Square, Pope Francis expressed his "great suffering and concern" about the "war between brothers" in Syria. He also called on the international community to "show greater sensitivity towards this tragic situation and do all it can to help the beloved Syrian nation find a solution to a war that is sowing death and destruction." It is precisely in the name of such "sensitivity",  [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] which entail reasonableness and solidarity, that we must point out contradictions that make us oppose a hasty and thoughtless attack. For the United States, the "evidence" that Damascus launched chemical weapons comes from an intercepted phone call by a Syrian Foreign Ministry official asking questions about a chemical attack, something that provides indirect but insufficient evidence. The more so since the "evidence" has not yet been shared with anyone, not even the UN, and that what we know comes from statements made by anonymous officials to certain media outlets.
In contrast, Russian satellite TV showed two missiles with chemical warheads launched from Duma, an area under rebel control, towards Ghouta, where they killed hundreds of people. [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] UN Investigators are already at work in Syria, gathering evidence on the use of chemical weapons, but they have had difficulties in the beginning when they came under sniper fire in rebel-controlled areas. The eagerness to launch an attack makes us forget that the experts are in Syria to determine whether there was a chemical attack and (perhaps but that is not their task) to gather clues about who possibly did it. But the United States and Great Britain have belittled their work, saying that the gases had already evaporated after a few days. However, according to some scholars, they could not since they tend to leave residual contamination in the air, on walls, hair, skin and clothes for months. Thus, waiting for the UN investigation to finish its job could shed light on many aspects of the story. [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]



[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] Indeed, some military experts and medical doctors question the veracity of the images released by the rebels. Since sarin gas remains active on the skin, they wonder why the volunteers and doctors treating the victims were not wearing any gas mask? We might also wonder why action is being taken now to punish the perpetrators of the heinous massacre in Ghouta, when more than 100,000 people have died in two years of civil war, with no one even lifting a finger? It seems to us that it is not "too late" to allow the UN to investigate since today Ban Ki-moon said that UN experts had made some convincing findings. To say that a military attack would facilitate a peace conference also seems quite out of place (outlandish too). [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] A military attack would certainly help the rebels, who at this moment are increasingly losing ground, despite the great help they have received from western states and Saudi Arabia and Qatar. However, boosting the opposition is likely to help both the secular wing of the Free Syrian Army, as well as its Al-Qaeda-linked jihadist component. One of the reasons why a peace conference has been hard to organise is precisely the conflict within the opposition, between secular and Islamist forces. A military attack might weaken Assad, but it would also accentuate rather than lessen the internal divisions in the rebel camp. When it comes to possible scenarios for the Middle East, one point must be made. [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] At the geopolitical level, there is the risk of a regional, if not a world war, with Syria, Lebanon (Hizbollah), Iran, Russia, China line up on one side and the US, France, Great Britain, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, etc., on the other. At the local level, it is hard to fathom what might happen to Syria, except to recognise that it has already become the fiefdom of many fundamentalist Muslims. For some observers, the country might disintegrate along ethnic boundaries; others suggest that a Kurdish state could emerge from bits of Syria, Iraq and Turkey .  Whatever the case may be, a military attack now would be the perfect trigger for years of violent instability in the Middle East. The result would be to deprive these countries of their best minds, whether Christian or Muslim.Almost immediately,  [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] the media circus stressed that the use of chemical weapons crossed Obama's "red line" against military intervention against Damascus. Eventually, cautious statements by the United States became more confident, buttressed by those of Great Britain, then France, Turkey, Canada, Australia and the Arab League. Syria's traditional allies, Russia, China, and Iran instead reiterated their opposition an intervention. More tentatively, Italy, Germany and Poland also expressed their hostility to an intervention, favouring instead political talks. At present, as the US fleet is being deployed off the Syrian coast, decisions are being made about an intervention. The latter should last only a few days; it should target sites provided by the rebels; it is not designed to bring down Assad;  [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] it will not stop a peace conference the UN and the Arab League are slowly preparing. Indeed, according to Arab sources, an attack against Syria will make such a conference easier to organise, Since the day when Ghouta was attacked, there has been a crescendo of statements, threats and promises to punish "crimes against humanity", which is how the use of chemical weapons is defined by the UN. At the same time, there has been a continuous drift towards the obvious conclusion that the Syrian regime was responsible for the chemical attack. Interventionist countries went first to the United Nations. When Syria and the rebels accepted the presence of inspectors, ensuring a cease-fire, the same countries said "it is too late",  [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]


[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] claiming that action was needed because "almost certainly" Damascus was responsible for the attack. Finally, last night, US Vice President Joe Biden said there was "no doubt" that the Syrian government was responsible. So did British Prime Minister David Cameron. Yet doubts do persist. On 25 August, speaking to the faithful in St Peter's Square, Pope Francis expressed his "great suffering and concern" about the "war between brothers" in Syria. He also called on the international community to "show greater sensitivity towards this tragic situation and do all it can to help the beloved Syrian nation find a solution to a war that is sowing death and destruction." It is precisely in the name of such "sensitivity",  [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] which entail reasonableness and solidarity, that we must point out contradictions that make us oppose a hasty and thoughtless attack. For the United States, the "evidence" that Damascus launched chemical weapons comes from an intercepted phone call by a Syrian Foreign Ministry official asking questions about a chemical attack, something that provides indirect but insufficient evidence. The more so since the "evidence" has not yet been shared with anyone, not even the UN, and that what we know comes from statements made by anonymous officials to certain media outlets.
In contrast, Russian satellite TV showed two missiles with chemical warheads launched from Duma, an area under rebel control, towards Ghouta, where they killed hundreds of people. [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] UN Investigators are already at work in Syria, gathering evidence on the use of chemical weapons, but they have had difficulties in the beginning when they came under sniper fire in rebel-controlled areas. The eagerness to launch an attack makes us forget that the experts are in Syria to determine whether there was a chemical attack and (perhaps but that is not their task) to gather clues about who possibly did it. But the United States and Great Britain have belittled their work, saying that the gases had already evaporated after a few days. However, according to some scholars, they could not since they tend to leave residual contamination in the air, on walls, hair, skin and clothes for months. Thus, waiting for the UN investigation to finish its job could shed light on many aspects of the story. [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] Indeed, some military experts and medical doctors question the veracity of the images released by the rebels. Since sarin gas remains active on the skin, they wonder why the volunteers and doctors treating the victims were not wearing any gas mask? We might also wonder why action is being taken now to punish the perpetrators of the heinous massacre in Ghouta, when more than 100,000 people have died in two years of civil war, with no one even lifting a finger? It seems to us that it is not "too late" to allow the UN to investigate since today Ban Ki-moon said that UN experts had made some convincing findings. [Obama ha pensato che il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] To say that a military attack would facilitate a peace conference also seems quite out of place (outlandish too). A military attack would certainly help the rebels, who at this moment are increasingly losing ground, despite the great help they have received from western states and Saudi Arabia and Qatar. However, boosting the opposition is likely to help both the secular wing of the Free Syrian Army, as well as its Al-Qaeda-linked jihadist component. One of the reasons why a peace conference has been hard to organise is precisely the conflict within the opposition, between secular and Islamist forces. A military attack might weaken Assad, but it would also accentuate rather than lessen the internal divisions in the rebel camp. [Obama ha pensato che il premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] When it comes to possible scenarios for the Middle East, one point must be made. At the geopolitical level, there is the risk of a regional, if not a world war, with Syria, Lebanon (Hizbollah), Iran, Russia, China line up on one side and the US, France, Great Britain, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, etc., on the other. At the local level, it is hard to fathom what might happen to Syria, except to recognise that it has already become the fiefdom of many fundamentalist Muslims.
For some observers, the country might disintegrate along ethnic boundaries; others suggest that a Kurdish state could emerge from bits of Syria, Iraq and Turkey . . [Obama ha pensato che il premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]

[[08/28/2013. SYRIA. Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late. The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions.]] Whatever the case may be, a military attack now would be the perfect trigger for years of violent instability in the Middle East. The result would be to deprive these countries of their best minds, whether Christian or Muslim. [Obama ha pensato che, il suo premio NOBEL, era utile nella latrina d Bush]


08/28/2013 18:25
SYRIA
Stopping the attack against Damascus before it is too late
by Bernardo Cervellera
The US version of the use of chemical weapons has too many contradictions. Someone does not want to wait for the UN results. It is untrue to think that a military strike would help the peace conference. Instead, it would help Islamists, who want to dominate the opposition.

Rome (AsiaNews) - The United States, Great Britain, France, and the Arab League are in a hurry to launch punitive action against Syria, guilty in their eyes of using chemical weapons against civilians in Ghouta, on the outskirts of Damascus on 21 August. Such a decision stems from charges made by the rebels who have posted online videos showing the chilling images of people dead from asphyxiation, children wrapped in shrouds, young people with muscle spasms and frothing at the mouth or with oxygen masks.

Almost immediately, the media circus stressed that the use of chemical weapons crossed Obama's "red line" against military intervention against Damascus.

Eventually, cautious statements by the United States became more confident, buttressed by those of Great Britain, then France, Turkey, Canada, Australia and the Arab League. Syria's traditional allies, Russia, China, and Iran instead reiterated their opposition an intervention. More tentatively, Italy, Germany and Poland also expressed their hostility to an intervention, favouring instead political talks.

At present, as the US fleet is being deployed off the Syrian coast, decisions are being made about an intervention. The latter should last only a few days; it should target sites provided by the rebels; it is not designed to bring down Assad; it will not stop a peace conference the UN and the Arab League are slowly preparing. Indeed, according to Arab sources, an attack against Syria will make such a conference easier to organise,

Since the day when Ghouta was attacked, there has been a crescendo of statements, threats and promises to punish "crimes against humanity", which is how the use of chemical weapons is defined by the UN. At the same time, there has been a continuous drift towards the obvious conclusion that the Syrian regime was responsible for the chemical attack.

Interventionist countries went first to the United Nations. When Syria and the rebels accepted the presence of inspectors, ensuring a cease-fire, the same countries said "it is too late", claiming that action was needed because "almost certainly" Damascus was responsible for the attack.

Finally, last night, US Vice President Joe Biden said there was "no doubt" that the Syrian government was responsible. So did British Prime Minister David Cameron. Yet doubts do persist.

On 25 August, speaking to the faithful in St Peter's Square, Pope Francis expressed his "great suffering and concern" about the "war between brothers" in Syria. He also called on the international community to "show greater sensitivity towards this tragic situation and do all it can to help the beloved Syrian nation find a solution to a war that is sowing death and destruction."

It is precisely in the name of such "sensitivity", which entail reasonableness and solidarity, that we must point out contradictions that make us oppose a hasty and thoughtless attack.

For the United States, the "evidence" that Damascus launched chemical weapons comes from an intercepted phone call by a Syrian Foreign Ministry official asking questions about a chemical attack, something that provides indirect but insufficient evidence. The more so since the "evidence" has not yet been shared with anyone, not even the UN, and that what we know comes from statements made by anonymous officials to certain media outlets.

In contrast, Russian satellite TV showed two missiles with chemical warheads launched from Duma, an area under rebel control, towards Ghouta, where they killed hundreds of people.

UN Investigators are already at work in Syria, gathering evidence on the use of chemical weapons, but they have had difficulties in the beginning when they came under sniper fire in rebel-controlled areas.

The eagerness to launch an attack makes us forget that the experts are in Syria to determine whether there was a chemical attack and (perhaps but that is not their task) to gather clues about who possibly did it.

But the United States and Great Britain have belittled their work, saying that the gases had already evaporated after a few days. However, according to some scholars, they could not since they tend to leave residual contamination in the air, on walls, hair, skin and clothes for months. Thus, waiting for the UN investigation to finish its job could shed light on many aspects of the story.

Indeed, some military experts and medical doctors question the veracity of the images released by the rebels. Since sarin gas remains active on the skin, they wonder why the volunteers and doctors treating the victims were not wearing any gas mask? We might also wonder why action is being taken now to punish the perpetrators of the heinous massacre in Ghouta, when more than 100,000 people have died in two years of civil war, with no one even lifting a finger?

It seems to us that it is not "too late" to allow the UN to investigate since today Ban Ki-moon said that UN experts had made some convincing findings.

To say that a military attack would facilitate a peace conference also seems quite out of place (outlandish too). A military attack would certainly help the rebels, who at this moment are increasingly losing ground, despite the great help they have received from western states and Saudi Arabia and Qatar. However, boosting the opposition is likely to help both the secular wing of the Free Syrian Army, as well as its Al-Qaeda-linked jihadist component.

One of the reasons why a peace conference has been hard to organise is precisely the conflict within the opposition, between secular and Islamist forces. A military attack might weaken Assad, but it would also accentuate rather than lessen the internal divisions in the rebel camp.

When it comes to possible scenarios for the Middle East, one point must be made.

At the geopolitical level, there is the risk of a regional, if not a world war, with Syria, Lebanon (Hizbollah), Iran, Russia, China line up on one side and the US, France, Great Britain, Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar, Turkey, etc., on the other.

At the local level, it is hard to fathom what might happen to Syria, except to recognise that it has already become the fiefdom of many fundamentalist Muslims.

For some observers, the country might disintegrate along ethnic boundaries; others suggest that a Kurdish state could emerge from bits of Syria, Iraq and Turkey . . . .

Whatever the case may be, a military attack now would be the perfect trigger for years of violent instability in the Middle East. The result would be to deprive these countries of their best minds, whether Christian or Muslim.


28/08/2013 11:14
SIRIA – LIBANO
Gregorio III: La democrazia si costruisce con la pace. L’attacco Usa è un atto criminale
Il Patriarca cattolico di Antiochia invita i Paesi occidentali ad ascoltare l’appello del papa. Un’azione armata distruggerà qualsiasi ipotesi di dialogo e riconciliazione futura. I cristiani verranno relegati in un ghetto. Senza di loro non può esistere un islam moderato. La scomparsa dei cristiani è un pericolo per tutto l’occidente e per il mondo arabo.

Beirut (AsiaNews) - "Ascoltiamo l'appello del Papa per la pace in Siria. Se i Paesi occidentali vogliono creare una vera democrazia devono costruirla con la riconciliazione, con il dialogo fra cristiani e musulmani, non con le armi. L'attacco pianificato dagli Stati Uniti è un atto criminale, che mieterà altre vittime, oltre alle migliaia di questi due anni di guerra. Ciò farà crollare la fiducia del mondo arabo verso il mondo occidentale". È quanto afferma ad AsiaNews Gregorio III Laham, patriarca greco-cattolico di Antiochia, di tutto l'Oriente, di Alessandria e di Gerusalemme dei Melchiti. L'appello giunge a poche ore dalle voci di un attacco imminente degli Stati Uniti contro Damasco. L'operazione è appoggiata da altri Paesi: Francia, Gran Bretagna, Turchia e Lega Araba. In questi giorni il prelato ha diffuso in tutte le parrocchie della Siria l'appello pronunciato lo scorso 25 agosto da papa Francesco.

"La voce dei cristiani - afferma il patriarca - è quella del Santo Padre. In questo momento occorre essere pragmatici. La Siria ha bisogno di stabilità e non ha senso un attacco armato contro il governo".

Gregorio III si domanda: "Quali sono le parti che hanno condotto la Siria a questa linea rossa? Chi ha portato la Siria a questo punto di non ritorno? Chi ha creato questo inferno in cui vive da mesi la popolazione?". "Ogni giorno - spiega -  in Siria entrano estremisti islamici provenienti da tutto il mondo con l'unico intento di uccidere e nessun Paese ha fatto nulla per fermarli, anzi gli Stati Uniti hanno deciso di inviare ancora più armi". Il prelato sottolinea che l'attacco pianificato dagli Usa colpirà soprattutto la popolazione siriana e non è meno grave dell'uso di armi chimiche.

Secondo il Patriarca, i Paesi occidentali continuano a sostenere un opposizione che non esiste, che non ha alcuna autorità sul campo. "I lavori per la conferenza di Ginevra 2 - sottolinea - sono fermi. La parola dialogo è ormai dimenticata. Per mesi i Paesi occidentali hanno perso tempo a discutere, mentre la gente moriva sotto le bombe di Assad e per gli attacchi degli estremisti islamici di al-Qaeda".

Gregorio III avverte che una eventuale vittoria degli islamisti darà vita a un Paese diviso in piccole enclavi, confinando i cristiani in un ghetto. "La nostra comunità si riduce ogni giorno. I giovani fuggono, le famiglie abbandonano le loro case e i loro villaggi". Per il prelato "la scomparsa dei cristiani è un pericolo non solo per la Siria, ma per tutta l'Europa". "La nostra presenza - afferma -  è la condizione essenziale per avere un islam moderato, che esiste grazie ai cristiani. Se noi andiamo via, non potrà esservi in Siria alcuna democrazia. Tale tesi è sostenuta anche dagli stessi musulmani, che temono la follia islamista. In molti affermano che non si può vivere dove non vi sono i cristiani". (S.C.)

28/08/2013 09:48
EGITTO
Minya: scuole, chiese e orfanotrofi bruciati per cancellare ogni traccia dei cristiani
Nei raid dopo la destituzione di Morsi, gli islamisti si sono accaniti persino su oggetti innocui come i giocattoli dei bambini. Le strutture ospitavano anche figli di musulmani provenienti dalle aree rurali.

Minya (AsiaNews) - Con almeno 20 assalti contro chiese, scuole e orfanotrofi cristiani, il governatorato di Minya è l'area dell'Egitto dove gli islamisti hanno colpito con più violenza e brutalità. "Gli islamisti - afferma un residente - hanno bruciato e distrutto tutto. Il loro fine era quello di cancellare ogni traccia dei cristiani, anche gli orfanotrofi sono stati distrutti e saccheggiati".

Gli abitanti raccontano che dopo aver assaltato la chiesa Prince Tadros el-Shatbi, gli estremisti islamici armati si sono diretti verso i due istituti per piccoli disagiati situati vicino alla parrocchia. Essi hanno prima rubato tutte le offerte, i vestiti, i giochi dei bambini, per poi dare alle fiamme l'intero edificio. Il rogo è durato oltre 5 ore.  "Fortunatamente - continua la fonte - i bambini sono stati portati in salvo prima dell'arrivo degli islamisti". Come altri luoghi appartenenti ai cristiani, i due istituti che ospitavano centinaia di orfani sono ormai ridotti a un cumulo di macerie. I criminali non si sono limitati a distruggere i due istituti, ma hanno anche demolito la piccola galleria dove i bambini esponevano i loro lavori manuali per ricevere piccole donazioni e le abitazioni di alcune famiglie a servizio dell'orfanotrofio.

Shurkri Huzayn, 40 anni, è il guardiano dell'orfanotrofio. Anch'egli orfano cresciuto nell'istituto, ha assistito all'assalto compiuto dai salafiti e afferma: "Che razza di persone sono queste? Nemmeno dei bruti assalterebbero un orfanotrofio". L'uomo racconta che gli islamisti si sono accaniti su ogni oggetto che simboleggiava il cristianesimo e la modernità, compresi i computer. Usciti dall'edificio i terroristi hanno bruciato i negozi vicini e le scuole, come quella  copta di St. Joseph School gestita dalle suore, una farmacia e un ristorante. I muri sui lati della strada sono stati imbrattate da insulti e scritte contro i cristiani. Alcuni giorni dopo lo scempio, Shukri Huzayn ha scritto sull'unica parete ancora pulita un messaggio agli islamisti: "Nonostante quello che avete fatto, chiediamo a Dio di perdonarvi. Dio esiste".

Secondo un'insegnante della scuola St. Joseph, le conseguenze di questo attacco avranno grandi ripercussioni sulla vita quotidiana della popolazione cristiana. "Gli insegnanti - afferma la donna - non sanno quando potrà cominciare l'anno scolastico, l'istituto serviva cristiani e musulmani e dava un'istruzione a centinaia di bambini provenienti dalle campagne, molti dei quali ospitati proprio nei due orfanotrofi".

Rimsha accused goes free
Published: August 21, 2013
Cleric acquitted due to ‘insufficient evidence’

The Muslim cleric suspected of framing Pakistani Christian girl Rimsha Masih has been acquitted.

The district court found there was insufficient evidence to convict Imam Khalid Jadoon Chishti, who was suspected of planting the burnt pages of some Islamic texts into the teenager’s bag.

Rights activist Basharat Khokhar, left; Mizrak Masih, centre; daughter Rimsha, right, in early 2013, after her release.Rights activist Basharat Khokhar, left; Mizrak Masih, centre; daughter Rimsha, right, in early 2013, after her release.

World Watch Monitor
Rimsha was arrested at the age of 14 in August last year and jailed after angry crowds threatened to burn Christian homes in the sector of Islamabad where her family lived.

Her case was dismissed in January 2013 after police were informed that Chishti had planted the burned pages on her.

The witnesses who testified against Chishti later withdrew their statements, claiming they were coerced by police.

Tahir Ashrafi, an Islamic cleric who heads the Pakistan Ulema Council, told World Watch Monitor he was disappointed at the court’s decision and that he had hoped Chishti’s case would serve as a warning for those who abuse Pakistan’s anti-blasphemy laws.

“We had hoped that exemplary punishment would be given to those who framed a minor girl in a blasphemy case for vested interests, but Jadoon’s acquittal has disappointed many,” he said.

Ashrafi said the state had failed to provide sufficient protection to the witnesses, which is why they retracted their statements.

"We had hoped that exemplary punishment would be given... but Jadoon’s acquittal has disappointed many."

--Tahir Ashrafi, Pakistan Ulema Council

Rimsha and her family were granted asylum in Canada earlier this year.

Her detention sparked international outcry about the application of the anti-blasphemy laws, and prompted former Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari to order an investigation of the case. She faced the prospect of being tried as an adult until the court ruled that she is a minor.

Last October, in response to its Universal Periodic Review at the UN, the Pakistani government cited the arrest of Chishti as progress, when confronted with multiple criticisms relating to the blasphemy laws, reports Christian Solidarity Worldwide.

It was described as sending “a strong message to all those trying to misuse” the laws, and a “turning point in the history of Pakistan”.

Now, one year after the highly charged episode began, the court’s dismissal of the charges against Chishti leaves no one standing before authorities to be held to account.

Chishti has made no secret of his distaste for Christians, reported the Guardian, even appearing on national television to bemoan the noisiness of church services which he said had disturbed Muslim residents.

He also welcomed the panicked departure of most of the Christians from the area. "We are not upset the Christians have left and we will be pleased if they don't come back," Chishti told the Guardian.

Rimsha accused goes free
Published: August 21, 2013
Cleric acquitted due to ‘insufficient evidence’

The Muslim cleric suspected of framing Pakistani Christian girl Rimsha Masih has been acquitted.

The district court found there was insufficient evidence to convict Imam Khalid Jadoon Chishti, who was suspected of planting the burnt pages of some Islamic texts into the teenager’s bag.

Rights activist Basharat Khokhar, left; Mizrak Masih, centre; daughter Rimsha, right, in early 2013, after her release.Rights activist Basharat Khokhar, left; Mizrak Masih, centre; daughter Rimsha, right, in early 2013, after her release.

World Watch Monitor
Rimsha was arrested at the age of 14 in August last year and jailed after angry crowds threatened to burn Christian homes in the sector of Islamabad where her family lived.

Her case was dismissed in January 2013 after police were informed that Chishti had planted the burned pages on her.

The witnesses who testified against Chishti later withdrew their statements, claiming they were coerced by police.

Tahir Ashrafi, an Islamic cleric who heads the Pakistan Ulema Council, told World Watch Monitor he was disappointed at the court’s decision and that he had hoped Chishti’s case would serve as a warning for those who abuse Pakistan’s anti-blasphemy laws.

“We had hoped that exemplary punishment would be given to those who framed a minor girl in a blasphemy case for vested interests, but Jadoon’s acquittal has disappointed many,” he said.

Ashrafi said the state had failed to provide sufficient protection to the witnesses, which is why they retracted their statements.

"We had hoped that exemplary punishment would be given... but Jadoon’s acquittal has disappointed many."

--Tahir Ashrafi, Pakistan Ulema Council

Rimsha and her family were granted asylum in Canada earlier this year.

Her detention sparked international outcry about the application of the anti-blasphemy laws, and prompted former Pakistani President Asif Ali Zardari to order an investigation of the case. She faced the prospect of being tried as an adult until the court ruled that she is a minor.

Last October, in response to its Universal Periodic Review at the UN, the Pakistani government cited the arrest of Chishti as progress, when confronted with multiple criticisms relating to the blasphemy laws, reports Christian Solidarity Worldwide.

It was described as sending “a strong message to all those trying to misuse” the laws, and a “turning point in the history of Pakistan”.

Now, one year after the highly charged episode began, the court’s dismissal of the charges against Chishti leaves no one standing before authorities to be held to account.

Chishti has made no secret of his distaste for Christians, reported the Guardian, even appearing on national television to bemoan the noisiness of church services which he said had disturbed Muslim residents.

He also welcomed the panicked departure of most of the Christians from the area. "We are not upset the Christians have left and we will be pleased if they don't come back," Chishti told the Guardian.[[08/28/2013 in EGYPT all friends of Obama, Minya: schools, churches and orphanages burnt to erase all traces of a Christian presence]] In a raid that followed Morsi's ouster, Islamists particularly raged against children's toys. The facilities were also open to children from rural Muslim families. Minya (AsiaNews) - With at least 20 attacks against churches, Christian schools and orphanages, Minya Governorate is the part of ​​Egypt where Islamists struck with greatest violence and brutality. "The Islamists", one resident said, "burnt and destroyed everything. Their goal was to erase all the traces of a Christian presence; even the orphanages were looted and destroyed." After storming the Prince Tadros el-Shatbi Church, the armed Islamic extremists turned their attention to two homes for disadvantaged children located near the parish church, residents said. They stole church offerings, clothes, and children's games before torching the entire building. The fire lasted over 5 hours.

[[08/28/2013 in EGYPT all friends of Obama, Minya: schools, churches and orphanages burnt to erase all traces of a Christian presence]]  "Fortunately," the source said, "the children were taken to safety before the arrival of the Islamists." Like other Christians sites, the two homes that housed hundreds of orphans are now a pile of rubble. The criminals did not only destroy the two orphanages but also the homes of some families working for the orphanages as well as a nearby art gallery that sold objects and artefacts made by orphans to raise money. Shurkri Huzayn, 40, is the orphanage guard. He, too, grew up as an orphan at the facility. He witnessed the Salafist attack. "What kind of people are they? Even unbelievers would not attack an orphanage," he said. Islamists raged particularly against anything that symbolised the Christianity and modernity, including computers. After they left the building, the terrorists burnt nearby shops and schools, such as the St Joseph Coptic School, which is run by nuns, a pharmacy and a restaurant.


[[08/28/2013 in EGYPT all friends of Obama, Minya: schools, churches and orphanages burnt to erase all traces of a Christian presence]]   Anti-Christian graffiti were sprayed on the walls along a road. A few days after the massacre, the guard said that Copts wrote a message on the wall of the orphanage in response to the militants' insults that read, "Despite of what you did, we ask God to forgive you," and "God exists."
According to a teacher at St Joseph, the attack will have a major impact on Christians' daily life.
"The teachers," she noted, "do not know when the school year will start. The school is open to Christians and Muslims and has taught hundreds of children from rural areas, many of whom were housed in the two orphanages."